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V 




FOREIGN CROPS AND M 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUU 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOm/cS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



ISSUED WIEKIY »Y 




Vol. 36 



June 18, 1938 



No. 24 



LATE CABLES. . . 



Rains in Canadian Prairie Provinces latter part of week ended June 
14 improved prospects of wheat crop in principal producing areas but lack 
of moisture serious in northern Alberta and northwestern Saskatchewan. 
Rain also needed in southern Manitoba to assure an average crop. Progress 
of crops generally good but later than last year. Some damage from cut- 
worms and wireworms reported. Grasshoppers hatching and active some sec- 
tions, but little injury noted. (Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.) 

Algeria 1938 production estimates placed as follows, with 1937 com- 
parisons in parentheses: Wheat 30,864.000 bushels (33,209,000), barley 
29,854,000 (27,469,000). oats 9,301,000 bushels (9,565,000). (Interna- 
tional Institute of Agriculture, Rome.) 

French Morocco 1938 areas sown to wheat and barley estimated at 
2,955,000 and 4,280,000 acres, respectively, as compared with 3,027,000 
and 4,795,000 acres in 1937; production placed at 25,426,000 bushels of 
wheat and 43,862,000 bushels of barley as compared with 20,895,000 and 
37,942,000 bushels, respectively, last year. (International Institute of 
Agriculture, Rome.) 

Tunis 1938 areas sov/n and production estimated as follows, with 
1937 comparisons in parentheses: Wheat 1,495,000 acres (2,429,000) and 
13,962,000 bushels (17,637,000); barley 741,000 acres (1,532,000) and 
5,971,000 bushels (9,186,000). (International Institute of Agriculture, 
Rome . ) 

Italy good rains, with temperature gradually increasing, second 
half of May resulted in great improvement of wheat and crops in general. 
(International Institute of Agriculture, Rome.) 

Australia wool sales opened at Brisbane June 14 with average selec- 
tion and keen competition. Chief buyers were from Japan and continental 
Europe. Compared with closing of preceding series of sales at Sydney on 
June 9, prices were very firm, and good clearance was effected. Sales 
closed June 16 with competition keen from same sources and prices firm. 
(Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor, London.) 



352 



Foreign Crops arid ILarkets 



Vol. 35, No. 24 



The European Dread-grain situation 

Prospects in late May pointed toward a good 1938 "bread-grain 
harvest in Europe as a whole, it was reported "by the Berlin office of the 
Bureau of .Agricultural Economics. With favorable weather conditions dur- 
ing the remainder of the growing and harvesting season, the combined 
outturn of wheat and rye should definitely exceed that of last year and 
probably the average for 1931-1935. The next few weeks, however, consti- 
tute a critical period for the maturing of crops, and significant changes 
may take place . 

The relatively favorable bread-grain prospects for 1938 , as com- 
pared with those of a year ago, are attributed largely to the much better 
outlook for rye in Central Europe. The 1937 rye harvest in Europe was 
greatly reduced by reason of extensive winter-kill and unfavorable spring 
growing conditions in the important producing countries, Germany, Poland, 
and Czechoslovakia. As the 1936 rye harvest was also below average in 
most countries, a good crop this year would do much to bring rye to the 
foreground again in both the bread- and feed-grain pictures. 

A fairly good wheat crop is in prospect in Europe, although the 
total outturn is expected to be well below that of last year and below 
average. The crop is largely influenced by the poor prospects in Spain 
and Italy. For Europe, other than those two countries, it' appears that 
a wheat crop about average in size may be harvested, and, should weather 
conditions be very favorable as the season advances, an above-average 
outturn would be quite possible. 

Compared with last year, 'crop prospects in regions or individual 
countries of Europe show some marked differences. In 1937 Italy, Greece, 
the ^Baltic States, and Scandinavia harvested very good wheat crops and, 
in the case of northern countries, also good rye crops. Central Europe 
and Prance, on the other hand, had relatively poor bread-grain outturns. 
This year indications point to a considerably reduced wheat crop in Italy, 
somewhat smaller crops in Greece and the northern European countries, but 
significantly larger outturns in Central Europe and Prance. For most of 
the other countries, including the Danube Basin, less marked changes are 
anticipated. 

Excluding Spain, the 1938 area seeded to wheat in Europe shows 
a small increase over that of last year and average. The European rye 
acreage also shows a small increase over last year. Inasmuch as winter- 
kill this year appears to have been very slight and generally below 
normal, whereas it was unusually severe last year in Central Europe, 
the area for wheat and rye remaining for harvest in 1938 should be con- 
siderably larger than that of a year ago. 

Practically all of Western, Central, and parts of Southern Europe 
experienced an unusually dry spring. The grain crops of Northern Italy 



June 18, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



363 



and parts of Worth Africa were most adversely affected by drought. In 
other European countries timely rains in May prevented any serious injury, 
"but soil-moisture supplies are generally low, and further deterioration 
may soon result if good rains are not received this month. The lack of 
rain is "becoming rather critical in the Scandinavian countries. Most of 
Europe also experienced unusually low temperatures and frosts during April, 
which checked plant growth. The development cf spring seedings likewise 
was retarded, and a period of warm weather and timely rains would "be helpful. 

The new crop situation has net had much effect upon developments 
of market, trade, and government activity regarding wheat, except in 
Italy. The greatly reduced crop prospect there rill probably result in 
several new control measures, particularly as Italy is again reaching an 
active import basis, tfheat-reserve purchases and defense stocks seem to 
be the general trend, especially with world ^heat prices at lew levels. 
The recent reserve purchases made by England may be followed by similar 
action in the Netherlands. France is expected to divert any domestic 
surplus into defense stocks, and Germany has already increased stocks as 
compared with those of a year ago. 

Mancnurian Government plans to increase soybean exports 

The Manchurian Government, in order tc increase soybean exports, 
plans to increase production for 1938 tc 165 million bushels and by 1S41 
to 184 million, according to a radiogram received from the Shanghai of- 
fice of the 3ureau of Agricultural Economics. The 1937 soybean crop, 
based on the revised estimate, amounted to 155,741,000 bushels compared 
with the harvest of 152,375,000 for 1935 and 165 million for the 10-year 
average, 1927-1936. 



It is reported that the Government plans to put soybean export 
trade under state control with a view to promoting increased exports. 
The control is expected to cover the following points: In the domestic 
field (1) to facilitate and enlarge the trade by farm cooperatives, 
(2) to control produce exchanges in order to prevent speculation, (3) to 
control productive capacity of the domestic oil mills, and (4) to estab- 
lish exporters' associations; in the foreign field (l) to promote trade 
relations with German;-, Italy, and Siam, (2) to fix standard domestic 
and export prices, (3) to grant Government export subsidies, and (4) to 
enlarge facilities for foreign trade investigations and communications. 
It is further reported that the Government believes the present ex- 
porters' systems of distribution are not conducted in the best interests 
of the export trade and it may decide on these grounds to eliminate them. 

The Dairen soybean market during April was strong, but the volume 
of business was less than in March, according to a report from Vice 



364 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 24 



Consul Maurice Pasquet. Prices at Dairen in early April, influenced by 
the extremely low European quotations, were the lowest for the season. 
Prices advanced sharply during the last half of April as interior Man- 
churian traders were reported holding soybeans off the market and "buying 
was increased "by Japanese exporters to cover contracts already concluded. 

Arrivals of soybeans at Dairen during April amounted to 201,000 
short tons as compared with 276,000 tons for March. Fnarf stocks at 
Dairen at the end of April equaled 165,000 tons as compared with 148,000 
tons at the end of March. 



MANCHURIA: Exports of soybeans and products, October -April 1936-37 
and 1937-38, and exportable surplus, April 30, 1937 and 1938 



Item 



Exports 





1936-37 1937-38 a/ 


1937 


1938 


Bean cake and meal... 


1,000 
short tons 
1,609 
550 
49 


1,000 

short tons 
1,637 
617 
55 


1,000 
short tons 
588 
309 
23 


1,000 
short tons 
805 
375 
26 




2,208 


2.309 


920 


1,206 



Exportable surplus 



Shanghai office, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, 
a/ Estimated. 

MANCHURIA: Prices of soybeans and soybean products at Dairen, 
May 27, 1938, with comparisons 



Item 



Soybeans. ......... 

Bean cake and meal 
Bean oil 



Average 
April 1937 



Cents 
1.70 
1.14 
5.12 



1938 



April 30 




May 27 
Cents 
1.58 
1.02 
3.53 



Shanghai office, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. 

Prance grants supplementary orange- import quotas 

The Paris office of the Department of Commerce has been advised 
unofficially by the Ministry of Agriculture that the United States share 
of the supplementary orange quota has been set at 25,000 quintals, or 
about 75,000 boxes, with prospects of an additional allotment, depending 
upon market conditions. Prior to this the Journal Officiel of June 12 
had carried a notice to importers of the opening of a supplementary quota 
of an unspecified amount for importation of oranges from the United 
States, Brazil, and South Africa. Applications were to be filed by 



June 18, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



355 



June 16 and by June 30 for any unused "balance. Granting of licenses to 
importers is contingent upon the exportation of 3.5 quintals of potatoes 
for every quintal of oranges imported. It is not believed, however, that 
this requirement will reduce imports of oranges. Reports indicate that 
orders have been placed for a substantial quantity of .American oranges. 

A pple exports from Canada increased in 1937-38 

The total exports of apples from Canada in the 1937-38 season were 
equal to 5,459,000 bushels compared with the light exports of 4,304,000 
bushels in 1935-37. The total was made up of 2,352,000 boxes and 
1,359,000 barrels. Nova Scotia and Ontario both exported larger quanti- 
ties of apples in 1937-38. Exports from 3ritish Columbia were the larg- 
est on record. Exports to Europe were equal to 43 percent of the 
commercial apple crop of 14,959,000 bushels. 

Consumption of fresh fruit in the United Kingdom hig±i 

The per capita consumption of fresh fruit in the United Kingdom 
was 85,9 pounds in 1937, the highest since the record year of 1934, ac- 
cording to the Weekly Fruit Intelligence Notes. Oranges, apples, and 
bananas were the most important fruits, with plums, grapefruit, lemons, 
and pears of secondary importance. Of the total consumed, only about 
one- fourth ras produced in the United Kingdom. 



IMBRNATIONAIj TRADE IN COTTON 

World cotton exports during the first 8 months of the current sea- 
son were more than 1 million bales less than those of the corresponding 
months last season, practically all the decline was due to a drop in 
British Indian exports, principally those to Japan. An 8 percent rise 
in Jnited States cotton exports more than made up for slight declines in 
those of Egypt, Brazil, and Argentina. The United States supplied 62 per- 
cent of the total, compared with 50 percent a year ago. 

United States.: In the 8-month period under review, the United States 
exported 365,000 bales more than during the corresponding period last year. 
Japan reduced purchases of American cotton from 1,295,000 bales in 1936-37 
to 454,000 bales so far this season; but this decline was 'more than offset 
by the increased shipments to other markets, especially those of Europe, 
xne United Kingdom, our most important outlet, took 1,434,000 bales, a gain 
of 483,000 bales over a year ago and 30 percent of total United States cot- 
ton exports, Italy purchased 438,000 bales, 152,000 bales more than a year 
earlier. G-ermany increased purchases by 111,000 bales. 



365 



foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 24 



INTER2TA.II ONAL TRADE IN COTTON, CONT'D 

British India: Exports from British India dropped to 1,006,000 
hales, the smallest since the close of the World War. Exports to all 
principal importing countries were under those of the preceding year. 
Japan took only 390,000 hales compared with 1,334,000 hales last season. 

Egypt: Exports from Egypt amounted to 1,306,000 bales compared 
with 1,440,000 hales a year earlier, a decrease of 9 percent. Smaller ex- 
ports to Japan were the principal explanation of this decrease. Exports to 
the United Kingdom, the United States, and Czechoslovakia were also under 
those of a year ago; hut those to several European countries were increased. 

Brazil: In the 7 months ended February 28, 1938, exports from 
Brazil differed little from those of last season but, with the new crop 
(estimated at the all-time peak of 2,205,000 bales) beginning to arrive 
on the market, exports may show an increase. 

Peru and Argentina : Peru exported 197,000 bales, approximately the 
same as last season. Due to a short crop, exports from Argentina dropped 
to 15,000 bales, one of the lowest on record. 

COTTON: Summary of world exports, August-March, average, 

1923-24 to 1932-33 and annual 1934-35 to 1937-38 ' 



Quantity 



Exporting 


Average 










countries 


1923-24 to 


1934-35 


i 1935-36 


j 1935-37 


; 1937-38 




1933-33 












1,000 bales 


1^000 bales 


: 1,000 bales 


: 1,000 bales 


•1.000 bales 


United States. 


6,601 


3,747 


! 5,058 


I 4,595 


; 4,981 


British India. 


1,816 


1,630 


i 1,850 


i 2,328 


; 1,007 




1,087 


1,237 


I 1,282 


i 1,440 


i 1,305 




75 


540 


: 366 


1 609 


! a/ 579 




130 


180 


1 224 


198 


197 


Argentina 


41 


69 


: no 


124 


15 




9,750 


7,403 


8,890 


9,295 


8,085 




Percentage of total 




Percent 


Percent 


Percent 


Percent j 


Percent 


United States. 


68 


51 


57 


50 j 


62 


British India. 


19 


22 : 


21 : 


25 : 


13 


Egypt • 


11 


17 ■ 


14 i 


15 ; 


16 


Brazil. 


1 


7 


4 • 


7 :' 


7 


Peru 




2 • 


3 


2 i 




Argentina 




1 : 


1 : 


l ; 


4 


Total 


100 


ioo i 


100 : 


100 : 


100 



Compiled from official sources, g/ Exports for March estimated at 30,000 
bales, b/ Less than 0.5 percent. 



June 13, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



367 



INTERNATIONAL TEALS IN COTTON, CONT'D 



COTTON; Destination of exports from the principal exporting countries, 
average 1923-24 to 1932-33 and seasons 1935-36 to 1937-38 a/ 



Destination 
of exports 
fron principal 
exporting 
countries 



August-! larch 



Exports frog the 
United States to 

Germany* 

United Kingdor: 

Trance 

Italy 

Spain 

Belgiu-% . . . 

Netherlands 

U • S . S . Pl. 
(Russia) d/. 

Sweden. 

Fortugal 

Poland & Danzig- 
Other Europe. . 
Total Europe 

Canada 

Japan 

China 

British India. 

Other countries 

Total 

British India to 



J apan 

Italy 

China 

Germany 

Belgium 

United Kingdor. 

France 

Spain 

Netherlands. . . 
Other countries 
To tal 



Quantity 



Percentage of total 



Average 








Average 








0.923-24 
; to 


1935-36 


1936-37 


1937-38 


1923-24 
to 


1935-36 


1936-37 


1937-38 


:l?32-33 








1 932-33 








■ 1 000 


1 000 


1 000 

X y WW 


] 000 










; ualus 


"bales 


Dal c s 


bal es 


r ercent 


Percent 


ir ercent 


r ercent 


; i.ooa 


s* f* ty 

6o3 




e r 7 ti 
boo 


<d3 


13 


11 


xo 


; X , UW± 


1 1 PQ 


t nop 


l 4P/i 

X , tOri 


P3 
</0 


PP 


PP 


OU 


74.7 


£1 Q 

Ol J 


ART 

OCX 


7PA 


X X 


1 P 

Xo 


~\ 4. 

Xrt 


xo 


1 D4D 


oUx 


ooo 


400 


Q 

o 


b 


O 






X oo 


"h/ 


u 




*± 


SJ 


u 


156 


150 


141 


172 


2 


3 


3 


3 


: 116 


60 


77 


108 


2 


1 


2 


id 


■ ^o 




n 

X 


h/ 


i 

X 


u. 


ol 


rl 


! AQ 


67 


7P 


f o 


T 
X 


"I 
X 


p 


p 


! 34. 


4.7 




OX 


X 


X 


X 


X 






XOl 


lot 




A 

4 


»7 

O 


>i 
4 


: 49 


79 


90 


205 


~~ 1 


2 


2 


3 


■ 5,061 


3, 513 


3,026 


4,062 


77 


O f 


OO 


82 


■ 155 


197 


215 


195 


2 






4 


| 1,065 


1 ,274 


1 ,295 


454 


16 

X w 


25 




Q 


! 223 


34 


1 3 


1 1 

u. -L 




1 

X 


c/ 


c/ 

_' 


• oo 


( 


Q 
O 




1 


r>l 

SJ 


1> 


o 


: 14 




39 


1 1 2 


c/ 

W 1 


1 

1- 


i 


p 


: 5,601 


5 , 058 


4,596 


4,981 


100 


100 


100 


100 


: 900 


954 


1 , 334 


390 


50 


52 


57 


39 


: 201 


66 


124 


56 


11 


4 


5 


7 


: 178 


38 


8 


48 


10 


2 


c/ 


5 


i 123 


163 


107 


87 


7 


9 


5 


9 


i 121 


126 


191 


80 


7 


7 


o 
O 


8 


I 111 


253 


327 


154 


6 


14 


14 


15 


• 88 


95 


85 


47 


5 


5 


4 


5 


: 37 


38 


V 


o/ el 


2 


2 


c/ 


c/ 


: 24 


26 


~32 


c/ T6 


1 


1 


~ 1 


~ 2 


32 


91 


120 


~ 118 


1 




6 


10 


: 1,315 


1,850 


2 , 323 


1,006 


100 


100 


100 


100 



shipped to other countries. According to German official trade returns, imports of 
American cotton for consumption in Germany amounts to 232,000 bales in August-March 
1937-38; 131,000 hales in 1335-37; and 338,000 hales in 1935-36. 



368 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 24 



INTERNATIONAL TRADE IK COTTON, CONT'D 

COTTON; Destination of exports from the principal exporting countries 
average 1923-24 to 1932-53 and seasons 1935-36 to 1937-38 a/ 



Destination 
of exports 
from principal 
exporting 
countries 



August-March 



Quantity 



Percentage of total 



Average 








Average 








_L SCO 

to 


1935-36 


1936-37 


1937-38 


to 


1935-36 


1936-37 


1937-38 


1932-33 








1932-33 








1,000 


1,000 


1 , 000 


1,000 










oal e s 


oal e s 


bal e s 


hales 


Percent 


Percent 


Percent 


Percent 


432 


442 


503 


434 


40 


34 


35 


33 


140 


179 


159 


180 


13 


14 


11 


14 


127 


43 


51 


29 


12 


3 


4 


2 1 


76 


117 


105 


150 


7 


' 9 


7 


11 ] 


72 


74 


71 


86 


7 


6 


5 


7 


50 


81 


194 


55 


5 


6 


13 


4 


48 


42 


50 


62 


4 


'3 


4 


5 I 


35 


71 


0 


1 


3 


6 


0 




33 


f/ 


fl 


f/ 


3 








— - 


22 


50 


55 


42 


2 


4 


'4 


31 


17 


49 


70 


101 


2 


4 


5 


81 


9 


26 


24 


29 


1 


2 


2 


2] 


26 


108 . 


148 


137 


1 


9 


10 


11 


1,087 


1,282 


1 , 440 


1 , 306 


100 


100 


100 


100 








August- 


February 










166 


169 


265 




50 


31 


48 




85 


189 


131 




26 


34 


24 




6 


66 


56 




2 


12 


10 1 




24 


26 


27 




7 


5 


5.1 




7 


12 


19 




2 


2 


4 1 




20 


16 


15 




6 


3 


31 




3 


12 


9 




1 


2 


2] 




15 


15 


8 




4 


3 


1 




6 


30 


4 




' 2 


5 


1 




V 


14 


15 




c/ 


3 


2-| 


g/ 71 




549 


549 


100 


Too 


100 


100 



Exports from 

Egypt to 

United Kingdom 

Prance 

United State 
Germany .... 

Italy 

Japan 

Switzerland 

Spain 

U. S . S . R. 

(Russia) . 
Czechoslovakia 
British India . 
Poland & Danzig 
Other countries 
Total 



B razil to 

Germany ....... 

United Kingdom 

Japan 

Prance 

Portugal ... 
Belgium-Lux em, 

Poland 

Netherlands 

Italy 

Other countries 
Total , 



Compiled from official sources. 

a/ Bales of 478 pounds net except for the United States which are in bales of 
500 pounds gross, b/ Less than 500 bales, c/ Less than 0.5 percent. d/ Begin- 
ning January 1, 193"5, includes Russia in AsiaT oj Seven months, August -February. 
If any, included in "Other countries", gy No data available by countries* 



June 18, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



369 



COTTON: Price per pound of representative raw cotton at Liverpool, 

June 9, 1938, with comparisons 



Growth 



1938 



April 



May 



22 



6 



i; 



20 ; 27 



June 



9 a/ 



Cents .Cents 



American - 

Middling 

Low Middling 

Egyptian (Fully Good Pair) - 

Sakellaridis 

Uppers 

Brazilian (Pair) - 

Ceara. 

Sao Paulo , 

East Indian - 

Broach (Fully Good) 

C.P. Oomra No. 1, Superfine 

Sind (Fully Good) 

Peruvian (Good) - 

Tangui s 



10.25 
8.70 

16.70 
12.19 

9.43 
10.16 

8.27 
8.73 
7.29 



9.97 
8.42 

16.29 
11.99 

9.14 
9.87 

8.19 
8.64 
7.00 



Cents 



9.75 
8.42 

15.82 
11.64 

8.92 
9.65 

7.96 
8.42 
6.78 



Cents .Cent s .Cents 



Cents • Cents 



9.88 
8.33 

15.89 
11.63 

9.06 
9.78 

8.10 
8.56 
6.71 



14.21 13.92 13.50 13.72 



9.69; 9.18 
8.13! 7.64 

15. 65 :i5.20 
11.59 ill. 24 

8.86; 8.36 
9.58- 9.08 

7.93: 7.43 
8.38: 7.89 
6.54 : 6.05 

13.52 12.79 



9.13 
7.69 

15.13 
11.13 

8.30 
8.92 

7.27 
7.73 
6.16 

12.74 



9.36 
7.92 

14.97 
11.36 

8.44 
9.05 

7.28 
7.73 
6.27 



Converted at current exchange rates. 

a/ Thursday's price due tc holiday, Friday, June 10. 

UNITED STATES: Exports of cotton to principal foreign markets, 
annual 1935-36 and 1936-37, and the season 
August 1-June 9, 1936-37 and 1937-38 a/ 
(F.unning "bales) 



Country to 
which exported 



Year ended July 31 



1935-36 



1936-37 



August 1-June 9 



1935-37 



1937-38 



1 iOOO . bal e s 1 ,000 Dales 



1,000 "ba les 



1,000 bale s 



United Kingdom 

Continental Europe 

Total Europe 

Japan 

Other countries 

Total 

Linter s 

Total , excluding 1 inters 



a/ Includes linters. 



1,466 : 


1,220 


1,152 


1,577 


2,936 : 


2,587 


2,456 


2,886 


4,402 • 


3,807 


3,608 


4,463 


1,548 


1,592 


1,545 


623 


333 ' 


380 


347 


; 507 


6,283 


5,779 


5,500 


5,593 


243 


259 


245 


251 


6,040 : 


5,520 


5,255 


5,342 


£ and Movement 


Report , 


New York Cotton Exchange. 



370 



Foreign drops and Markets 



Yol. 36, No. 24 



.ARGENTINA: Area, production, and exports of corn, 1927-28 to 1937-38 

III ■■■I. MIH IIII| 1)^J» 1 |.U^I11JU-U ' KMI» I.J III I 



Crop year 
April-March 



1927- 28. .. 

1928- 29. . . 

1929- 30 . . . 

1930- 31... 

1931- 32. . . 

1932- 33. . . 

1933- 34; . . 

1934- 35. . . 

1935- 36.. . 

1936- 37... 

1937- 38... 



Area 



Exports during 





: Harvested 


1 Production 








season 


i t om =,^ rft o 


. 1,000 P/>.ras 




1 ,000 Tnishftl a 


10,739 


8,999 


311,597 


246,240 


11,831 


9,026 


252,408 


209 , 532 


13,955 


; 10,428 


280,617 • 


206,421 


13,776 


11,577 


419,661 ; 


387,365 


14,468 


9,518 


299,329 


250,318 


14,539 


9,373 


267,761 


209,378 


16,096 


10,161 


256,913 


209,464 


17,358 


14,091 


451,943 : 


311,882 


18,854 ; 


12, 650 


395,694 • 


352,268 


15,973 j 


11,929 


359,615 


270,027 


15,318 • 


7,388 ; 


178,927 j 





Compiled from official source: 



HOGS AMD PORK PRODUCTS: Foreign and domestic average prices per 100 pounds, 
— April 1938. wi th comparisons. 



Item 



1909-1913 

aye rage 



HSgs., Chicago, basis 
packers 1 and shippers' 
quotations 

. Corn , Chicago, No. 3 Yellow 

Hogs , heavy, Berlin, live 
weight 

Barley . Leipzig 

Lard - 

Chi cago , 

Liverpool , 

Hamburg 

Cured pork - 
Liberpool - 

American short cut green 
hams 

American green bellies.... 

Danish Wiltshire sides 

Canadian green sides 



Dollars 



comp^ 
1925-1929 

.average . 



Dollars 



Apr. 1937 



Dollars 



8.04 
1.11 


12.05 
1.65 


; 9.9? 
2.41 


9.12 
1.03 


; 8.28 
: 1.05 


11.18 
1.77 


13.78 
2.37 ; 


16.79 
3.34 ■ 


17.23 
' 3.29 


: 17.23 
3.28 


10.33 
11.70 
12.90 


14. 78 : 
15.02 ; 
15.43 ; 


12. 62 i 
14.76. j 
13.23 


9.95 
11.55 

. 10. 85 


9.35 
11.06 
10.16 


14.10 

15.00 
14.16 


23. 72 i 
20.56 ; 
24.55 : 
a/21.55 : 


20 .81 . I 
17.02 : 
20.72 ; 
18.48 : 


20.25 
15.66 
22.73 : 
19.52 ' 


20.35 
14.95 
23.62 
20.79 



Mar. 1938 



Dollars 



aj 4-year average only. 



June 18, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



271 



HCGS .y~D ?::~Z PECDUCIS: Indie 
Octo"ber-April, 



es of foreign supplies and demand, 
1934-35 to 1937-38 



Country 
and 
item 



Oc toper-April 



1909-10 1924-25 



Unit 


■ to 

•1913-14 

javerage 


: to 
; 1928-29 
\ average 


1934-35 


1935-36 


1° 36-37 


• 1937-38 


1,000 














pounds; 


\ 39,277 


: 52,140 


57,274 


53,645 


45,077 


ii 


140,624 


292,492 


: 252,334 


228,285 


. 214,474 


i 220,396 


it 




1 33,417 


28 , 322 


31,841 


; 33,356 


: 33,118 


it 


3.11,875 


66,293 


2,020 


1,009 


890 


923 


!l 


; 23,571 


45 , 364 


65,263 


58,055 


95,158 


92,503 


II 


.300,048 


526,695 


450,949 


424,423 


449,136 


455,032 


11 


131 , 658 


156,855 


133,684 


97 , 327 


94,025 


107,820 


II 


: 52,215 


70,739 


40,234 


37,405 


40,175 


43,221 


1,000' 


si 1,010 


1,674 


1,818 


1,839 


2,613 


2,262 


n 




1,916 


2,059 


1,402 


2,310 


2,001 


IT 


j 2,512 


2,366 


2,757 


1,866 


2,987 


2,821 


1,000 














pounds: 1,669 


11,146 


16,907 


15,391 


11,853 


8 ,095 


ii 


123,290 


134,571 


34,811 


52 , 5 55 


39,006 


56,317 


1,000' 


3' 19,732 


29 ,303 


21 , 555 


18.355 


24,676 


22.070 


1,000 














pounds: 78,385 


40,387 


1,148 


390 


454 


705 




: 1,145 


6,862 


0 


13 


0 


50 


it 


: 4,405 


12,297 


2,761 


604 


600 


457 


it 


106,958 


85 , 390 


5,187 


1,584 


1,765 


3,546 


tt 


•80,219 i 


82,848 


25,737, 


19,234 


15,640. 


24,085 


n 


•92,762 ; 


99,490 


31,672 i 


22,551 


19,786! 


27 , 609 


n 


102,520 : 


136,501 


83,939: 


37,996 


30,916; 


31,268 


it 


:86,057 i 


112,673 


2,513. 


4,351 


1,036 : 


2,170 


it 


■21,065 : 


48,198. 


18, 683 i 


12,293- 


19,241: 


29,596 


IT 


: 23, 377 •' 


26,510 i 


9 ; 


40- 


12 : 


77 




285,333 


437,782 


114,154' 


57,097 


49,230 127,584 



'-V::zz z::::c;:.: ; : 

Supplies , domestic • 
fresh pork, London 
Imports - : 
Sac on - 

Denmark J 

Irish Free State.; 
United States. . . 

Canada \ 

xctal. ..»•. 

Lard, total j 

Ham, total ; 

CANADA: 

— — — _ * 

Slaughter - \ 
Hogs, inspected '. 
GEHMA-TY ; ; 
Production - ; 
Hog receipts ; 

14 cities : 

Hog slaughter ' 

36 centers : 

Imports - ; 

Sacon, total ; 

Lard, total. ...... • 

"TITSD STATES ; : 
SLaught er - : 
Hogs, inspected...: 
Export s - ; 
Bacon - ; 
United Kingdom. . . | 

Germany : 

Cuba ; 

Total ; 

Hams, shoulders - ; 
United Kingdom. . . ■ 

Total j 

Lard - 
United Kingdom. . . : 

Germany ; 

Cuba. : 

Netherlands. .....: 

Total 



372 Jo reign Crops and Markets Vol. 36, No. 24 



BUTTER: New Zealand grading, 1937-38 season to June 2, 
with comparisor s 



Date ; 1935-36 1936-37 ; 1937-38 

» ■ ■ iii ■ ■ ■ - m .n .ii.11 i M , j il l m fn l . i ■ i . . . .. ' .i . I 

Week ended . 1.000 pounds | 1.000 pounds ■ 1.000 pounds 

August l-February 28 24?. t 794 j ' 254,067 j 240,447 

March 5 ; 7,784 : 8,064 \ 7,672 

12 J 7,952 i 8,002 i 7,952 

19 j 7,336 i 7,672 i 7,000 

26 | 6,440 | 6,328 : 6,496 

Monthly total ; 29.512 j 30.066 j 29.120 

April 2 j 6,440 7,056 \ 5,499 

9 : 5,600 j 6,406 j 4,760 

16 : 5,656 ; 6,216 \ 3,864 

23 j 4,704 i 5,712 ; 4,480 

30 ; 4,704 , , \ 5,, 247 • 15- 473 . 

Monthly total : 27,104 j ^0,63 7 j _2_J_2_ 

May 7 \ 3,864 4,256 3,282 

14 j 2,968 : 3,136 2,856 

21 i 2,296 : 2,912 i 2,576 

28 ! 1.960 ; 2.240 \ 2,184 

Monthly total ; 11,0 88 j : 10 ,898 — 

June 2 ; 1. 456 1.792 1.708 

ToiaJ to June 2 3 11.954 329.106 304.248 

Agricultural Attache C. G. Taylor, London. 

BUTTER: Australian grading, 1937-38 season to May 21, 
with comparisons 

Date 1935-36 1936-37 ; 1937-38 



leek ende d j l T 0QO pmmrta j 1,000 pounds : l^____pound.s 

July l-Iebruary 26..: .. 177.933 ■ 133 f 393 I L-/) T 714 

March 5 : 4,601 5,398 i 5,799 

12 ; 4,02 7 4,995 5,304 

19 : 3,799 : 4,329 j 4,449 

26 : 3,774 : 4-, 4-00 j 3,898 — 

Monthly total 16 , 201 ; 19 . 122 \ 19,450 

April 2 ! 3,761 j 4,178 : 3,212 

9 ! 2,773 i 4,200 3,109 

16 : 3,076 3,644 i 2,124 

23 ; 2,701 ; 3,223 ; 4,032 

30 j 2,222 j 2,444 2.643 

Monthly total | 14,533 ! 17,689 ; 15,120 

May 7 i 1,557 : 2,554 2,975 

14 ■ 1,308 ; 1,452 2,112 

21 970 1,496 1,611 

.Total to May 21 " 312,502 175,706 201,982 



Weekly Deary Produce Notes, Imperial 3conomic Committee, London. 



■June 13, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



3P-3 



-* — i.-.: Price per pound ir. New York, San Francisco, Zrperha^en, 
and London, June 9, 1938, with comparisons 



Market and description 


.Tim & 1 O 








Cents 


Cents 


Cents 




31.0 


26.0 


25.0 


San rrancisco, 92 score.. 


32.0 


26.0 


26.0 


Copenhagen, official quotation 


19.5 


. 21.8 


21.8 


London; 










25.1 


27.3 


27.4 




24.2 


27.0 


26.7 




23.5 


25. 6 


24.8 



Foreign prices converted at current rates of exchange. 



LIVESTOCK AIyD MEAT: Price per 100 pounds in specified European markets, 
June 3, 1936, with comparisons a/ 

Week ended 



Market and item 


June 9, 


June 1, 


June 8, 




1937 


1938 


1936 




Dollars 


Dollars 


• Dollars 


Cermany: 










17.31 


17.34 


. 17.34 


Price of lard, tcs., Hamburg 


14.01 


9.56 


9.47 


United Kingdom: b/ 








■ Prices at Liverpool, first 








quality - 








American green tellies.... 


17.07 


14.46 


; 14.48 


• Danish Wiltshire sides.... 


19.17 


21.64 


21.66 




16.52 


19.32 


19.39 


American short cut green 










20.93 


21.03 


21.10 


American refined lard 


15.05 


10.23 


10.39 



Liverpool quotations are on the "basis of sales from importer to whole- 
saler. " " 

aj Converted at current rate of exchange. 
*p_/ Week ended Friday. 



37'+ 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 2k 



Inde 
Page 



Late cables 361 



Apples, exports, Canada, 1937-3S.. 3°5 
Parley: 
Area! 

Morocco, 1937,193o 36l 

Tunis, 1937,193c' 361 

Production: 

Algeria, 1937,1933 361 

Morocco, 1937,1933 361 



Tunis, 1937,1938 3bl 

Butter: 

Gradings: 

Australia, May 21, 19~2 ~^~]2 

New Zealand, June 2, 1933..... 37? 
Prices, specified markets, 



June 9, 193C 373 

Corn: 

Area, Argentina, 1927-I937 370 

Exports, Argentina, I928-I.937... 370 

Prices, U.S., April 1938 370 

Production, Argentina, 

1927-1937 370 

Cotton: 

Exports, U.S., June 9, 1938 369 

International trade, August- 
March, 1937-38 365 

Prices, U.K., June 9, I938 369 

Fruit (fresh), per-capita 

consumption, U.K., 1937 • 3^5 

Hogs: 
Prices : 

Ge rmany , Ap r i 1 and 

June 8, 193S 370,373 

U.S. , April 193S. 370 

Slaughter: 



Canada, October- Aoril 1037-38. 371 

Germany, October-April 1937-38 371 

U.S., Oc to be r-Ap ril 10 5 7-38 .... 3 71 
Lard : 

Exports, U.S., October- April 

i33T te ~3^* •••••••••••••••••••••• 37-1- 



.0 Page 

Lard, cont'd: 
Imports : 

Germany, October-April 1937-38 371 

U.K., October-April 1937-3S 371 

Frices: 

Germany, June 8, 1938 373 

•Specified markets, April 1938. 370 



U.K., June 8, 19^8 373 

Oranges, import quota, for American, 

Prance, June 16, 193 8 36U 

Oats, production, Algeria, 

1937,1938.. , 36l 



Pork: . 

Exports , U.S., 

October-April 1937-38 371 

Imports: 

Oe rmany, .. . 

October-April 1937-38 371 

U.K., October-April<d937-3£. . . 371 



Prices, U.K., April and 

June 8, 1938 370,373 

Supplies , U.K. , 

October-April 1937-38 371 

Soybeans : 

Exportable surplus, Manchuria, 

April 50, 1938 36U 

Exports, Manchuria, 

October-April 1037-38 36U 

Prices, Dairen, May 27, 1938.... 36U 



Production expansion program, 



Manchuria, I938-I9U1 363 

Wheat: 
Area: 

Morocco, 1937,1038 36l 

Tunis, 1937,193S 36l 

Crop prospects: 

Canada/ June lU, 1038 361 

Europe, May 31, 

1933 361,362 

Production: 

Algeria, 1937,1938 3&1 

Morocco, 1037,1978 36l 

Tunis, 1937,1938 36l 

Wool, sales, Sydney, Australia, 

June lU, 1938 36l